Category: Soviet Union

Ghanaian Racial Citizenship in the Soviet Union and U.S., 1957-1966

By Nana Osei-Opare On May 25, 2020, a white American police officer, Derek Chauvin, and two other police officers murdered George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man. Floyd’s murder sparked global outrage and a reckoning on anti-Black racism. Even right-wing television evangelist Pat Robertson, a… Continue Reading “Ghanaian Racial Citizenship in the Soviet Union and U.S., 1957-1966”

Face to Face Encounters: Letter-Writers and Portrait Photographs in the Russian State Archive

Hannah Parker On the final research trip for my PhD, I found some small portrait photographs of letter-writers in a file of between some hundred and a thousand 1925 letters to the editor of Krest’ianka – a series of biographies with enclosed photographs from… Continue Reading “Face to Face Encounters: Letter-Writers and Portrait Photographs in the Russian State Archive”

Reading Russian Sources

George Gilbert Reading Russian Sources: creating a new edited collection When I was tasked with editing the collection Reading Russian Sources for Routledge, one of the first questions that came to mind – and the spirit I will be approaching this blog post with – is,… Continue Reading “Reading Russian Sources”

The jokes always saved us: humour in the time of Stalin

Jonathan Waterlow This piece was originally published at Aeon under a creative commons licence, and has been reproduced here with the agreement and encouragement of the author. Stalinism. The word conjures dozens of associations, and ‘funny’ isn’t usually one of them. The ‘S-word’ is… Continue Reading “The jokes always saved us: humour in the time of Stalin”

Redefining the ‘Born’ Murderer: Lombrosian Legacies in Early Soviet Criminological Discourse.

Mark Vincent. The 1876 publication of Italian criminologist Cesare Lombroso’s L’uomo delinquent (‘Criminal Man’) caused quite a stir amongst professionals in late Imperial Russia, in addition to the field of Western social scientists. Whilst some elements of Lombrosian thought, such as inherited criminal impulses, a link… Continue Reading “Redefining the ‘Born’ Murderer: Lombrosian Legacies in Early Soviet Criminological Discourse.”