Category: Essays

Realising Socialism Abroad? What Communist History Has To Offer In International History Education

Ilana Hartikainen Even in an age of increasing globalization and close connections between different countries and regions, most history in schools is still taught from a national perspective. American students, for example, learn of the American Revolutionary War with a clear set of good…

The British Army’s Chinese Auxiliaries in Arctic Russia

Yuexin Rachel Lin While conducting research in the Academia Sinica digital archives in 2017, I stumbled across a remarkable document: A list of Chinese workers, part of a labour company recruited by the Slavo-British Legion in the northern Russian cities of Murmansk and Archangel….

Becoming a Virtual Historical Tour Guide: Where to Start

Eleanor Janega Historical tours have long been a mainstay of popular history. In central London, for example, on any given day one can witness flocks of tourists following their intrepid guides – umbrellas aloft – down footpaths too narrow to accommodate them all. In…

What Does ‘Inclusion’ Include?: Making Space for Students

Erin Katherine Krafft One of the courses that I teach most frequently is a social theory course for students in their second year of college. I teach no first-year courses, so the students are new to me, and I am new to them. On…

Innovating Digital History in the Classroom: an interview with Drs James Baker and Sharon Webb

Back in July, the Royal Historical Association awarded its 2019 Innovation in Teaching Award to Dr James Baker and Dr Sharon Webb at the University of Sussex. This week Stephanie Wright from History caught up with both prize winners to learn more about how…

Using Scrapbooks as Historical Sources

Cherish Watton. Think of any topic, and someone, somewhere, has probably made a scrapbook on it. People scrapbooked on things which were important to them; family, friendships, professional activity, popular culture, political, and associational activity. Scrapbooks didn’t just document family life. Politicians and diplomats…

Historiography in Action: Teaching and Learning Historiographical Approaches through Active Primary Source Analysis

Liz Goodwin. This semester, my students discussed their memories of the London 2012 Olympic Games. For the majority of them, this took place when they were around 11/12 years old, in the summer between primary and secondary school. They wrote a paragraph down in…

Do Mention the War: Discourses of Sacrifice and Obligation in White Rhodesian Society, 1964-1965

David Kenrick. Contemporary political discourse in Britain is saturated by sepia-tinged memorialisation of the Second World War. Parties across the country’s growing political divide invoke slogans and imagery redolent of the ‘blitz spirit’ or ‘going it alone’. Far from being a recent development, politicians…

Mo Moulton’s ‘Mutual Admiration Society’: How Dorothy L. Sayers and her Oxford circle remade the world for women

Mo Moulton. In 1912, Dorothy L. Sayers and five friends founded a writing group at Somerville College, Oxford; they dubbed themselves the ‘Mutual Admiration Society.’ Barred, initially, from receiving their degrees despite taking classes and passing exams, the women battled for a truly democratic…

Not a bit “English”: Architecture, Emotions and Empire in a “Muslim World”

Sara Honarmand Ebrahimi. In 2011, I visited the Morsalin Hospital in Kerman (southern Iran) for the first time. I intended to work on the revitalisation plan of a historic hospital for my MA dissertation, and I was advised to focus on this hospital –…