Category: Contemporary

Heritage or Highway: York’s city walls as tourist and civil infrastructure

Louisa Hood This blog explores two very particular histories of York’s city walls. Although known generally as Roman or medieval defences, the social, material, economic, and other histories of the walls are layered, obscured, or unknown. York’s extant walls are a key aspect of… Continue Reading “Heritage or Highway: York’s city walls as tourist and civil infrastructure”

Britain First: The official history of the United Kingdom according to the Home Office – a critical review

Frank Trentmann BRITAIN FIRST: The official history of the United Kingdom according to the Home Office – a critical review Following this summer’s open letter to the Home Office, this article by Frank Trentmann offers an analysis of the official history chapter in the… Continue Reading “Britain First: The official history of the United Kingdom according to the Home Office – a critical review”

Historians Call for a Review of Home Office Citizenship and Settlement Test

21 July 2020 Historians Call for a Review of Home Office Citizenship and Settlement Test We are historians of Britain and the British Empire and writing in protest at the on-going misrepresentation of slavery and Empire in the “Life in the UK Test”, which… Continue Reading “Historians Call for a Review of Home Office Citizenship and Settlement Test”

Edgerton & Empire: Nationalism, Imperialism and Decolonisation

Liam Liburd One of the indirect and unintended side-effects of the tragic murder of George Floyd by an officer of the Minneapolis Police Department in late May has been a renewed effort to confront Britain’s own history of racism, especially that in the form… Continue Reading “Edgerton & Empire: Nationalism, Imperialism and Decolonisation”

The jokes always saved us: humour in the time of Stalin

Jonathan Waterlow This piece was originally published at Aeon under a creative commons licence, and has been reproduced here with the agreement and encouragement of the author. Stalinism. The word conjures dozens of associations, and ‘funny’ isn’t usually one of them. The ‘S-word’ is… Continue Reading “The jokes always saved us: humour in the time of Stalin”

Emotions and Work: an interview with Agnes Arnold-Forster and Alison moulds

In November 2019, Agnes Arnold-Forster and Alison Moulds held ‘Emotions and Work’, a day-long conference funded by the Royal Historical Society and the Wellcome Trust via the Living with Feeling Project at QMUL, exploring the troubled relationship between emotions and labour, and considering how… Continue Reading “Emotions and Work: an interview with Agnes Arnold-Forster and Alison moulds”

Hospitals for All?

Barry Doyle As the nation struggles with the most pervasive health crisis for one hundred years, the central role of hospitals as community resources for all, irrespective of residence, nationality or ethnic background, is obvious. Today we would expect patients to be treated solely… Continue Reading “Hospitals for All?”

Becoming a Virtual Historical Tour Guide: Where to Start

Eleanor Janega Historical tours have long been a mainstay of popular history. In central London, for example, on any given day one can witness flocks of tourists following their intrepid guides – umbrellas aloft – down footpaths too narrow to accommodate them all. In… Continue Reading “Becoming a Virtual Historical Tour Guide: Where to Start”