Category: Gender

The Cat in the Cradle: Conspiracy Theories and Credible News, 1688 – and Now

By Laura Doak On 10 June 1688 a new Prince of Wales was born at St. James’s Palace, London, and whispers swept across Europe. Some claimed that the baby, born to King James VII & II and his queen, Mary of Modena, was a… Continue Reading “The Cat in the Cradle: Conspiracy Theories and Credible News, 1688 – and Now”

A Sexual Tour of Venice: Mapping a Sixteenth-Century Catalogue of Courtesans

By Hannah Johnston Sometime around 1565, a price-list of Venice’s cortigiane oneste, or “honest courtesans,” who served the city’s upper echelons, was published in Venice.[1] Titled Il catalogo di tutte le principali et più honorate cortigiane di Venezia (“The Catalogue of All the Principal… Continue Reading “A Sexual Tour of Venice: Mapping a Sixteenth-Century Catalogue of Courtesans”

Celebrating the Accession Day of Elizabeth I of England, 1558 and Beyond

By Aidan Norrie On 17 November 1558, Elizabeth, daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, succeeded to the throne of England and Ireland upon the death of her half-sister Mary I. She was England’s fourth monarch in eleven years (or fifth, if Jane Grey… Continue Reading “Celebrating the Accession Day of Elizabeth I of England, 1558 and Beyond”

‘”A celebrated correspondence between the charming Mrs C- formerly well-known in the fashionable World – & her Amiable Daughter”’: The Historical Importance of the letters of Hitty and Bess Canning.[1]

By Rachel Smith Whilst reading through the eighteenth-century Canning Family archive at the West Yorkshire Archive Service in Leeds, I came across a rather interesting letter from John Murray, a publisher, to a Mrs Butler. Dated 25th July 1912, he wrote that I gather… Continue Reading “‘”A celebrated correspondence between the charming Mrs C- formerly well-known in the fashionable World – & her Amiable Daughter”’: The Historical Importance of the letters of Hitty and Bess Canning.[1]

Face to Face Encounters: Letter-Writers and Portrait Photographs in the Russian State Archive

Hannah Parker On the final research trip for my PhD, I found some small portrait photographs of letter-writers in a file of between some hundred and a thousand 1925 letters to the editor of Krest’ianka – a series of biographies with enclosed photographs from… Continue Reading “Face to Face Encounters: Letter-Writers and Portrait Photographs in the Russian State Archive”

Men and Feminism: Gender Equality in the Nordic Countries, 1960s to Present

DR HANNAH YOKEN I’m a Finnish historian who lived in the UK for nearly a decade. When I tell my British friends and colleagues where I’m from, they often respond with an air of admiration, complimenting the relatively egalitarian principles upon which Nordic social democracy… Continue Reading “Men and Feminism: Gender Equality in the Nordic Countries, 1960s to Present”

What It Feels Like for a Girl: Gendering the History of the Senses

SASHA RASMUSSEN When asked to describe my work, I tend to say that my research sits at the intersection of gender and sensory histories. Gender as a lens of historical analysis has by now been widely adopted, but the concept of ‘sensory history’ may… Continue Reading “What It Feels Like for a Girl: Gendering the History of the Senses”

Material Culture and Identities: The Case of Eighteenth Century Toby Jugs

KERRY LOVE A main principle of material culture theory (the study of objects and their relationships to people) is that they can reflect or shape the people who lived alongside them in any given time. I have always enjoyed studying objects more than any… Continue Reading “Material Culture and Identities: The Case of Eighteenth Century Toby Jugs”

A Global History of Sex and Gender

DR HANNAH TELLING What is gender history and why does it matter? For me, it is a discipline that provides a fascinating insight into the often-overlooked aspects of history. I was first introduced to gender history as an undergraduate and the University of Edinburgh,… Continue Reading “A Global History of Sex and Gender”

Lucy Jane Santos’ ‘Half Lives: The Unlikely History of Radium’

Lucy Jane Santos In the late 19th century that Wilhelm Röntgen discovered a previously unknown form of powerful radiation that was invisible to the human eye. This type of ray, which no one (including Röntgen) fully understood at the time, was so mysterious that… Continue Reading “Lucy Jane Santos’ ‘Half Lives: The Unlikely History of Radium’”