Category: Political History

The Cat in the Cradle: Conspiracy Theories and Credible News, 1688 – and Now

By Laura Doak On 10 June 1688 a new Prince of Wales was born at St. James’s Palace, London, and whispers swept across Europe. Some claimed that the baby, born to King James VII & II and his queen, Mary of Modena, was a… Continue Reading “The Cat in the Cradle: Conspiracy Theories and Credible News, 1688 – and Now”

Portraits of Female Power in Argentina: Encarnación Ezcurra and Eva Perón

By Rachel Morgan The last three decades of the twentieth century have witnessed a boom in writings on Latin American women to the left of the political spectrum. When considering the topic of leftist Argentine women in power, the image of Eva Perón is… Continue Reading “Portraits of Female Power in Argentina: Encarnación Ezcurra and Eva Perón”

Replacing Ireland’s Lost Records: Doing Public History with the Beyond 2022 Project

By Elizabeth Biggs One hundred years ago, in the spring and early summer of 1922, the Public Record Office of Ireland in the Four Courts complex in Dublin was occupied by anti-Treaty forces, with Rory O’Connor as one of their leaders. They were opposed… Continue Reading “Replacing Ireland’s Lost Records: Doing Public History with the Beyond 2022 Project”

Blurring the lines of the two kingdoms: kirk and council in Scotland, 1689-1708

By Robbie Tree As the British Cabinet continues to run rough shod over its responsibilities, we hear grumblings over the effectiveness of our leaders and the legitimacy of central government intervention into the daily lives of the populace. These issues were relevant to early… Continue Reading “Blurring the lines of the two kingdoms: kirk and council in Scotland, 1689-1708”

Toppling Tyrants: Early Medieval Approaches to Regime Change

By Harry Mawdsley “[He] had very little sense. He conducted all his affairs without paying the slightest heed, till at length, employing a heavy hand against [his subjects], he was the cause of violent hatred and outrage among them” Such was the damning description… Continue Reading “Toppling Tyrants: Early Medieval Approaches to Regime Change”

Celebrating the Accession Day of Elizabeth I of England, 1558 and Beyond

By Aidan Norrie On 17 November 1558, Elizabeth, daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, succeeded to the throne of England and Ireland upon the death of her half-sister Mary I. She was England’s fourth monarch in eleven years (or fifth, if Jane Grey… Continue Reading “Celebrating the Accession Day of Elizabeth I of England, 1558 and Beyond”

Reflections on ‘The World At War’

DANIEL ADAMSON I was recently intrigued to find a repeat of the 1973 documentary The World at War buried in the depths of Freeview television. Across 26 hour-long episodes, this series chronicled the course of the Second World War and charted the key experiences of the… Continue Reading “Reflections on ‘The World At War’”

Analysing Jacobite Prisoner Lists with JDB45

Analogous Analysis Paralysis: The Stultifying Weltschmerz of Jacobite Prisoner Lists DR DARREN SCOTT LAYNE Now nearly three centuries on from Jacobitism’s imminent threat to the British post-revolution state, the movement’s historical record is still a living entity with plenty of room for growth. To… Continue Reading “Analysing Jacobite Prisoner Lists with JDB45”

Healing the Whig schism: 300 years on

Robin Eagles Fractures within political parties are nothing new. In 1717, the apparent unity that the Hanoverian accession had instilled in the Whigs came to an end amid infighting over direction of policy and disagreement over who was to hold what post in the… Continue Reading “Healing the Whig schism: 300 years on”

The jokes always saved us: humour in the time of Stalin

Jonathan Waterlow This piece was originally published at Aeon under a creative commons licence, and has been reproduced here with the agreement and encouragement of the author. Stalinism. The word conjures dozens of associations, and ‘funny’ isn’t usually one of them. The ‘S-word’ is… Continue Reading “The jokes always saved us: humour in the time of Stalin”