Category: Memory

Researching (from) a Ducal Residence: the Tower Apartment of Mary of Hamal at the Castle of Heverlee

By Miara Fraikin In March 2020 – not the best timing to be honest – I started my PhD research within the Horizon 2020 funded European Training Network PALAMUSTO (Palace Museum of Tomorrow). Uniting ten researchers from nine hosting institutions in five European countries,… Continue Reading “Researching (from) a Ducal Residence: the Tower Apartment of Mary of Hamal at the Castle of Heverlee”

Portraits of Female Power in Argentina: Encarnación Ezcurra and Eva Perón

By Rachel Morgan The last three decades of the twentieth century have witnessed a boom in writings on Latin American women to the left of the political spectrum. When considering the topic of leftist Argentine women in power, the image of Eva Perón is… Continue Reading “Portraits of Female Power in Argentina: Encarnación Ezcurra and Eva Perón”

Replacing Ireland’s Lost Records: Doing Public History with the Beyond 2022 Project

By Elizabeth Biggs One hundred years ago, in the spring and early summer of 1922, the Public Record Office of Ireland in the Four Courts complex in Dublin was occupied by anti-Treaty forces, with Rory O’Connor as one of their leaders. They were opposed… Continue Reading “Replacing Ireland’s Lost Records: Doing Public History with the Beyond 2022 Project”

Narratology for Historical Research: Medieval Texts and Crusader Cannibals

By Katy Mortimer Historians use various methodologies to investigate the past. A particularly prominent feature of recent historiography, for example, is the exploration of social and cultural history, such as questions of gender, religion, power, and material culture. From the mid-twentieth century, moreover, the… Continue Reading “Narratology for Historical Research: Medieval Texts and Crusader Cannibals”

Toppling Tyrants: Early Medieval Approaches to Regime Change

By Harry Mawdsley “[He] had very little sense. He conducted all his affairs without paying the slightest heed, till at length, employing a heavy hand against [his subjects], he was the cause of violent hatred and outrage among them” Such was the damning description… Continue Reading “Toppling Tyrants: Early Medieval Approaches to Regime Change”

‘”A celebrated correspondence between the charming Mrs C- formerly well-known in the fashionable World – & her Amiable Daughter”’: The Historical Importance of the letters of Hitty and Bess Canning.[1]

By Rachel Smith Whilst reading through the eighteenth-century Canning Family archive at the West Yorkshire Archive Service in Leeds, I came across a rather interesting letter from John Murray, a publisher, to a Mrs Butler. Dated 25th July 1912, he wrote that I gather… Continue Reading “‘”A celebrated correspondence between the charming Mrs C- formerly well-known in the fashionable World – & her Amiable Daughter”’: The Historical Importance of the letters of Hitty and Bess Canning.[1]

Reflections on ‘The World At War’

DANIEL ADAMSON I was recently intrigued to find a repeat of the 1973 documentary The World at War buried in the depths of Freeview television. Across 26 hour-long episodes, this series chronicled the course of the Second World War and charted the key experiences of the… Continue Reading “Reflections on ‘The World At War’”

Trouillot in the Digital Age: A Fifth Crucial Moment for Public Historians?

AARON SHUMAN Last semester, one of my professors assigned a chapter of anthropologist Michel-Rolph Trouillot’s Silencing the Past as a jumping off point for considering how silences can work their way into the historical narrative. During our weekly Zoom-based class, conversation homed in on the ‘four… Continue Reading “Trouillot in the Digital Age: A Fifth Crucial Moment for Public Historians?”

HMT Dunera 80 years on: How rough justice changed the life of a child refugee to Britain

DR RACHEL PISTOL AND DR MELISSA STRAUSS 2020 marks the 80th anniversary of when 2,546 men were deported from Britain to Australia on the HMT Dunera. The convict ships of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries may have ceased their travels some 70 years before but that… Continue Reading “HMT Dunera 80 years on: How rough justice changed the life of a child refugee to Britain”

Feeling Sickness: Emotional responses to pandemic diseases

DR MONICA O’BRIEN It’s a wintery afternoon and, once again, I’m scrolling through news articles about Covid-19. Since countries entered their first lockdowns, much has been written on the pandemic’s emotional and psychological impacts.  Loss, loneliness, fear, stress, anger; these emotions figure prominently in… Continue Reading “Feeling Sickness: Emotional responses to pandemic diseases”