Category: Memory

Reflections on ‘The World At War’

DANIEL ADAMSON I was recently intrigued to find a repeat of the 1973 documentary The World at War buried in the depths of Freeview television. Across 26 hour-long episodes, this series chronicled the course of the Second World War and charted the key experiences of the… Continue Reading “Reflections on ‘The World At War’”

Trouillot in the Digital Age: A Fifth Crucial Moment for Public Historians?

AARON SHUMAN Last semester, one of my professors assigned a chapter of anthropologist Michel-Rolph Trouillot’s Silencing the Past as a jumping off point for considering how silences can work their way into the historical narrative. During our weekly Zoom-based class, conversation homed in on the ‘four… Continue Reading “Trouillot in the Digital Age: A Fifth Crucial Moment for Public Historians?”

HMT Dunera 80 years on: How rough justice changed the life of a child refugee to Britain

DR RACHEL PISTOL AND DR MELISSA STRAUSS 2020 marks the 80th anniversary of when 2,546 men were deported from Britain to Australia on the HMT Dunera. The convict ships of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries may have ceased their travels some 70 years before but that… Continue Reading “HMT Dunera 80 years on: How rough justice changed the life of a child refugee to Britain”

Feeling Sickness: Emotional responses to pandemic diseases

DR MONICA O’BRIEN It’s a wintery afternoon and, once again, I’m scrolling through news articles about Covid-19. Since countries entered their first lockdowns, much has been written on the pandemic’s emotional and psychological impacts.  Loss, loneliness, fear, stress, anger; these emotions figure prominently in… Continue Reading “Feeling Sickness: Emotional responses to pandemic diseases”

Remembering English Saints in 2020: A Pilgrimage in Print

Stained glass window from Canterbury Cathedral depicting the cure of woman through prayer to St Thomas a Becket

DR PAUL WEBSTER 2020 will be a year that lives long in the memory.  For historians of the medieval saints, and at cathedrals and great churches across England, and for historians of the medieval saints, it began as a major anniversary year. The Association of… Continue Reading “Remembering English Saints in 2020: A Pilgrimage in Print”

Deep Mapping Migrant Settlerhood: Unfolding histories of Finns in Canada

DR SAMIRA SARAMO At the turn of the twentieth century, Finnish migrants, drawn by the familiar landscape of lakes, forests, and rocky outcrop, settled in the rugged wilderness of Northern Ontario in Canada and overcame the harsh conditions of the early years through their… Continue Reading “Deep Mapping Migrant Settlerhood: Unfolding histories of Finns in Canada”

Role Theory and Protestant Spirituality in Early Modern Scotland

CIARAN JONES I recently submitted my PhD thesis on Protestant spirituality in early modern Scotland. Focussing on witchcraft trials, my thesis was mainly concerned with how your average seventeenth-century peasant articulated certain spiritual ideas. Using mostly manuscript records of witchcraft trial confessions as my source base,… Continue Reading “Role Theory and Protestant Spirituality in Early Modern Scotland”

Historians Call for a Review of Home Office Citizenship and Settlement Test

21 July 2020 Historians Call for a Review of Home Office Citizenship and Settlement Test We are historians of Britain and the British Empire and writing in protest at the on-going misrepresentation of slavery and Empire in the “Life in the UK Test”, which… Continue Reading “Historians Call for a Review of Home Office Citizenship and Settlement Test”

Edgerton & Empire: Nationalism, Imperialism and Decolonisation

Liam Liburd One of the indirect and unintended side-effects of the tragic murder of George Floyd by an officer of the Minneapolis Police Department in late May has been a renewed effort to confront Britain’s own history of racism, especially that in the form… Continue Reading “Edgerton & Empire: Nationalism, Imperialism and Decolonisation”

Do Mention the War: Discourses of Sacrifice and Obligation in White Rhodesian Society, 1964-1965

David Kenrick. Contemporary political discourse in Britain is saturated by sepia-tinged memorialisation of the Second World War. Parties across the country’s growing political divide invoke slogans and imagery redolent of the ‘blitz spirit’ or ‘going it alone’. Far from being a recent development, politicians… Continue Reading “Do Mention the War: Discourses of Sacrifice and Obligation in White Rhodesian Society, 1964-1965”