Category: Britain

Richard III, the Princes in the Tower, and Thomas More – answers to the mystery?

Tim Thornton The fascination evoked by Richard III and the mystery of the ‘princes in the Tower’ continues to grow. The discovery of Richard’s body under a carpark in 2012 and his reburial in Leicester Cathedral in 2015 drew international attention, and a stellar… Continue Reading “Richard III, the Princes in the Tower, and Thomas More – answers to the mystery?”

Collecting Contexts – Why Do We Collect?

Will Burgess During the summer of 2019, I volunteered at the V&A’s Lansbury Micro Museum in Poplar, East London, to help run an exhibition called For the Love of Things. The exhibition put the personal collections of the museum’s visitors on display, its shelves changing… Continue Reading “Collecting Contexts – Why Do We Collect?”

Material Culture and Identities: The Case of Eighteenth Century Toby Jugs

Kerry Love A main principle of material culture theory (the study of objects and their relationships to people) is that they can reflect or shape the people who lived alongside them in any given time. I have always enjoyed studying objects more than any… Continue Reading “Material Culture and Identities: The Case of Eighteenth Century Toby Jugs”

HMT Dunera 80 years on: How rough justice changed the life of a child refugee to Britain

Rachel Pistol and Melissa Strauss 2020 marks the 80th anniversary of when 2,546 men were deported from Britain to Australia on the HMT Dunera. The convict ships of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries may have ceased their travels some 70 years before but that did not… Continue Reading “HMT Dunera 80 years on: How rough justice changed the life of a child refugee to Britain”

Everyday Decolonisation: the local museum in 2020

Pippa Le Grand A few Monday mornings ago, I stood outside Weston Park Museum, Sheffield, enjoying my job and welcoming visitors. There were few enough around that I was able to gaze at the frieze over the door and even discuss it at length… Continue Reading “Everyday Decolonisation: the local museum in 2020”

Remembering English Saints in 2020: A Pilgrimage in Print

Stained glass window from Canterbury Cathedral depicting the cure of woman through prayer to St Thomas a Becket

Paul Webster 2020 will be a year that lives long in the memory.  For historians of the medieval saints, and at cathedrals and great churches across England, and for historians of the medieval saints, it began as a major anniversary year. The Association of English… Continue Reading “Remembering English Saints in 2020: A Pilgrimage in Print”

Role Theory and Protestant Spirituality in Early Modern Scotland

Ciaran Jones I recently submitted my PhD thesis on Protestant spirituality in early modern Scotland. Focussing on witchcraft trials, my thesis was mainly concerned with how your average seventeenth-century peasant articulated certain spiritual ideas. Using mostly manuscript records of witchcraft trial confessions as my source base,… Continue Reading “Role Theory and Protestant Spirituality in Early Modern Scotland”

Heritage or Highway: York’s city walls as tourist and civil infrastructure

Louisa Hood This blog explores two very particular histories of York’s city walls. Although known generally as Roman or medieval defences, the social, material, economic, and other histories of the walls are layered, obscured, or unknown. York’s extant walls are a key aspect of… Continue Reading “Heritage or Highway: York’s city walls as tourist and civil infrastructure”

John Stearne’s Confirmation and discovery of witchcraft

New Book Interview: Scott Eaton, John Stearne’s Confirmation and Discovery of Witchcraft: Text, Context and Afterlife (Routledge, 2020). History: How did this project develop? Where did your interest in the subject originate? Scott: My interest in the history of witchcraft started during my BA at Ulster University… Continue Reading “John Stearne’s Confirmation and discovery of witchcraft”

Britain First: The official history of the United Kingdom according to the Home Office – a critical review

Frank Trentmann BRITAIN FIRST: The official history of the United Kingdom according to the Home Office – a critical review Following this summer’s open letter to the Home Office, this article by Frank Trentmann offers an analysis of the official history chapter in the… Continue Reading “Britain First: The official history of the United Kingdom according to the Home Office – a critical review”